Turning Theory into Algorithms

Jonathan Huggins Machine Learning Leave a Comment

[latexpage]┬áSome of the common complaints I hear about (learning) theoretical work run along the lines of “those bounds are meaningless in practice,” “that result doesn’t apply to any algorithm someone would actually use,” and “you lost me as soon as martingales/Banach spaces/measure-theoretic niceties/… got involved.” I don’t have a good answer for the latter concern, but a very nice paper by Sasha Rakhlin, Ohad Shamir, and┬áKarthik Sridharan at NIPS this year goes some ways toward address the first two criticisms. Their paper, “Relax and Randomize: From Value to Algorithms,” (extended version here) is concerned with transforming non-constructive online regret bounds into useful algorithms.

Healthy Competition?

Michael Gelbart Neuroscience Leave a Comment

Last week I attended the NIPS 2012 workshop on Connectomics: Opportunities and Challenges for Machine Learning, organized by Viren Jain and Moritz Helmstaedter. Connectomics is an emerging field that aims to map the neural wiring diagram of the brain. The current bottleneck to progress is analyzing the incredibly large (terabyte-petabyte range) data sets of 3d images obtained via electron microscopy. The analysis of the images entails tracing the neurons across images and eventually inferring synaptic connections based on physical proximity and other visual cues. One approach is manual tracing: at the workshop I learned that well over one million dollars has already been spent hiring manual tracers, resulting in data that is useful but many orders of magnitude short of …